Paul Calder

How to get a perfect fit in an odd-sided, curved, enclosed space?

20 Dec

 

It’s been a while since I’ve done a boat repair tip. Here’s one I used yesterday on a friend’s boat.

        Have you ever found yourself trying to duplicate a particularly odd four-sided shape, maybe in an enclosed area or on a curved surface? I ran into this problem when working on an icebox. The box is going to be built into a cockpit seat. It’s basically going to be a drink cooler so in order to make the best of a very small space it will be built with minimal insulation and directly against the hull. I started ...

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How to get a perfect fit in an odd-sided, curved, enclosed space?

20 Dec

 

It’s been a while since I’ve done a boat repair tip. Here’s one I used yesterday on a friend’s boat.

        Have you ever found yourself trying to duplicate a particularly odd four-sided shape, maybe in an enclosed area or on a curved surface? I ran into this problem when working on an icebox. The box is going to be built into a cockpit seat. It’s basically going to be a drink cooler so in order to make the best of a very small space it will be built with minimal insulation and directly against the hull. I started ...

Read More

The Many-Headed Hydra

10 Dec

 
     I am, finally, back home in New Orleans after a long jaunt down the East Coast. The crew and I were completely out of touch with the world for the past few weeks as we explored some of the more remote reefs in the Florida Keys and made the jump out to the Dry Tortugas and home to New Orleans from there. Now we’re surrounded by friends, airing out stale projects, re-combobulating the trappings of life on land. There’s a bicycle hanging in a wharehouse on St. Ferdinand, a few boxes from the attic of a house on Urquhart, some ...

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The Many-Headed Hydra

10 Dec

 
     I am, finally, back home in New Orleans after a long jaunt down the East Coast. The crew and I were completely out of touch with the world for the past few weeks as we explored some of the more remote reefs in the Florida Keys and made the jump out to the Dry Tortugas and home to New Orleans from there. Now we’re surrounded by friends, airing out stale projects, re-combobulating the trappings of life on land. There’s a bicycle hanging in a wharehouse on St. Ferdinand, a few boxes from the attic of a house on Urquhart, some ...

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Kedging in the ICW

6 Nov

Photos Courtesy of Mon Iker
 
After a bit of an absence I would like to return with a bang, or at least a soft thud. I am currently cruising South from Maine with a crew of friends, headed for New Orleans. We’ve made it as far as Florida, always a good place for adventure.

I (maybe unfairly) tend to think of the ICW as slow, expensive, and often dull, so we’ve been staying offshore most of the time. But there are exceptions, most recently the stretch between St. Augustine and Lake Worth when we decided, for once, to avoid...
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Kedging in the ICW

6 Nov

Photos Courtesy of Mon Iker
 
After a bit of an absence I would like to return with a bang, or at least a soft thud. I am currently cruising South from Maine with a crew of friends, headed for New Orleans. We’ve made it as far as Florida, always a good place for adventure.

I (maybe unfairly) tend to think of the ICW as slow, expensive, and often dull, so we’ve been staying offshore most of the time. But there are exceptions, most recently the stretch between St. Augustine and Lake Worth when we decided, for once, to avoid...
Read More

Freediver ‘Base Jumps’ at Dean’s Blue Hole

21 Mar

I’ve never quite understood the appeal of competitive freediving, in much the same way that I don’t get why people choose to run marathons through a desert in the middle of summer. My friend George Stoyle once told me about his fleeting obssession with freediving quarries in England and and for a moment I was three years old again, standing open-mouthed and asking ‘Why?, Why?, Why?’ while he described diving into pitch black, freezing cold water where you only know you’ve hit bottom when your hand sinks into icy black muck, you come up with a nosebleed as often as ...

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Freediver ‘Base Jumps’ at Dean’s Blue Hole

21 Mar

I’ve never quite understood the appeal of competitive freediving, in much the same way that I don’t get why people choose to run marathons through a desert in the middle of summer. My friend George Stoyle once told me about his fleeting obssession with freediving quarries in England and and for a moment I was three years old again, standing open-mouthed and asking ‘Why?, Why?, Why?’ while he described diving into pitch black, freezing cold water where you only know you’ve hit bottom when your hand sinks into icy black muck, you come up with a nosebleed as often as ...

Read More

Sailing Through Mardi Gras

8 Mar
It’s no surprise to me that so many sailors are also writers, nor that the best of these often live out secluded lives. Not a few classics in the genre include passages about the glorious solitude of sailing singlehanded over great distances, of living alone in a small cabin with only an oil lamp, a molding library, and a notepad for company. For us who have never crossed an ocean, but want to, have yet to single-hand, but quietly carry big plans, have barely started books, but dream of finishing them, these sea stories carry a fair weight, amplified of ...
Read More

Sailing Through Mardi Gras

8 Mar
It’s no surprise to me that so many sailors are also writers, nor that the best of these often live out secluded lives. Not a few classics in the genre include passages about the glorious solitude of sailing singlehanded over great distances, of living alone in a small cabin with only an oil lamp, a molding library, and a notepad for company. For us who have never crossed an ocean, but want to, have yet to single-hand, but quietly carry big plans, have barely started books, but dream of finishing them, these sea stories carry a fair weight, amplified of ...
Read More

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