Wind Steady as Gimbals Aloosing

6 Nov

November 2, 2018

Day 29

Noon Position: 19 53S 128 21W

Course(t)/Speed(kts): SxE 7 – 8

Wind(t/tws): ENE 18 – 21

Sea(t/ft): NE 8

Sky: Light cumulus low and cirrus high, mare’s tails

10ths Cloud Cover: 2

Bar(mb): 1020+

Cabin Temp(f): 82

Water Temp(f): 79 (down)

Relative Humidity(%): 67

Sail: Two reefs in genoa and main. Dancing between a reach and a close reach.

Noon-to-Noon Miles Made Good (nm): 176

Miles since departure: 3830

Avg. Miles/Day: 132

Wind stayed steady from the NE all night, if 18 – 21 with touches of 24 counts as steady. At 18, our rig, double reefed for close reaching, was perfect. At 21 – 24, Mo and skipper felt the press, though our hearts were gladdened by the frequent visits to 8 knots.

Seas have built to that boulder garden stage, and the sensation is that of sailing through a rock quarry just after the dynamite blast. Mo leaps and flings thick water everywhere. If on deck, one is guaranteed a drenching forward of the pilot house, but there is no safety anywhere but below.

At midnight we were T-boned by a squall. For reasons unknown I was in the pilot house when wind suddenly went to 35 knots. Mo laid right over. Heavy rain flew sideways. I eased the main and let Mo run off for an hour. Then back we went the wind to 18 – 20.

This has continued all day. It’s a fast but soul crushing ride.

Today’s story is about gimbaled stoves.

Mo has one, and a week ago the gimbal knobs on which the stove rests began to squeak. So I oiled them. Confession: I used a handy spray can of penetrating oil. A week later, I notice that the gimbal knobs are no longer turning with the stove as the stove swings. The penetrating oil has penetrated the threads of the fastener holding the gimbal knob in place, and the two are slowly working apart.

The stove is in danger of being set free to roam the cabin at will, an unpleasant emancipation for those on the down hill side of the boat when this occurs. Tightening the fasteners required removal of the stove top and grate and some delicate maneuvering between the burners. Not at all difficult in one’s home marina, but while riding Mo the Water Flinger as she charges into the great unknown…it was touch and go for a while.

This article was syndicated from The Figure 8 Voyage

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