Too Windy: No Classics Racing in Cannes

23 Sep

AP-Cannes

The official word:

The weather forecast unfortunately arrived and following long consideration, the Race Committee opted for abandoning today’s racing, as the wind was too strong to allow for safe sailing. It was confirmation of what had been hoped for by many spectators and fans who had the chance to admire from just inches away the stunning beauty of the old yachts, their hulls, booms, teak decks and the posters outlining each boat’s history and features.

The weather forecast unfortunately arrived and following long consideration, the Race Committee opted for abandoning today’s racing, as the wind was too strong to allow for safe sailing. It was confirmation of what had been hoped for by many spectators and fans who had the chance to admire from just inches away the stunning beauty of the old yachts, their hulls, booms, teak decks and the posters outlining each boat’s history and features.

The weather forecast unfortunately arrived and following long consideration, the Race Committee opted for abandoning today’s racing, as the wind was too strong to allow for safe sailing. It was confirmation of what had been hoped for by many spectators and fans who had the chance to admire from just inches away the stunning beauty of the old yachts, their hulls, booms, teak decks and the posters outlining each boat’s history and features.

On the subject of sailboats, there are so many details and numbers to consider. The classic yachts taking part in the Régates Royales de Cannes – Trophée Panerai may be considered the quintessence of complexity. Waterline length, hull length, overall length, maximum beam, mast height, draft, downwind and upwind sail area, sail plan, rig, displacement, build year, etc. Each boat has a number of features that make them a unique piece of craftsmanship. In this whirl of wood and canvas some data can help figure out the diversity of the fleet.

Facts and figures

The smallest boat: Cabrufa, a Bermudan sloop from 1970 only 7.67 metres long

The biggest boat: Elena of London, with an overall length of 50.71 metres

The oldest boat: Marigold, a gaff cutter from 1892

The youngest boat: in the Esprit de Tradition category, which includes replicas built in recent years but respecting in full the original characteristics, the most recent yacht is Alcyon 1871, that came out of the shed in 2013.

The tallest mast: With her 48 metre-tall mast, Shamrock V, has the highest rig of the fleet.

This article was syndicated from BLUE PLANET TIMES

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