Sailfeed
July 3rd

GREEN 37: New Centerboard Yawl Design by Jay Paris

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Profile and sailplane

Just heard recently from Jay Paris, N.A., who has been SAIL magazine’s technical advisor since before time began. He sent drawings and details of an intriguing upscaled version of the 32-foot centerboard yawl he designed and built for himself. (For details on that boat be sure to check this post here.) He calls this new design the Green 37, as he claims it “reduc[es] the environmental impact of construction and operation in terms of accommodation, payload and performance.” I’m scratching my head over that a bit, but in all other respects I find this a fascinating concept and would love to see one of these built someday.…

Read More
July 3rd

GREEN 37: New Centerboard Yawl Design by Jay Paris

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Profile and sailplane

Just heard recently from Jay Paris, N.A., who has been SAIL magazine’s technical advisor since before time began. He sent drawings and details of an intriguing upscaled version of the 32-foot centerboard yawl he designed and built for himself. (For details on that boat be sure to check this post here.) He calls this new design the Green 37, as he claims it “reduc[es] the environmental impact of construction and operation in terms of accommodation, payload and performance.” I’m scratching my head over that a bit, but in all other respects I find this a fascinating concept and would love to see one of these built someday.…

Read More
July 1st

HOOLIGAN NAVY: Sailing Yachts On Sub Patrol During WWII

Posted by // July 1, 2015 // COMMENT (6 Comments)

Corsair bow image

When I was boy during summers spent on the Maine coast at the mouth of Kennebec River my mother used to tell us a story from when she was a girl growing up on the river, of how once during the war a Nazi submarine was spotted near the river’s entrance. To me this always sounded crazy, until I got older and read more about the war and learned how badly German U-boats had ravaged shipping all along the East Coast right after the U.S. entered the war in December 1941. My mom’s story might well have been apocryphal, but it was not at all improbable, for in those days U-boats did indeed operate with impunity quite close to our shores.…

Read More
June 26th

Shaft seal

I have previously mentioned the problem I was having over the fall and winter with my engine being badly out of alignment. How I’d just run the engine anyway and eventually the prop shaft would whip it right back in line, and how this seemed to culminate in a shaft-seal leak that plagued me on the last leg of Lunacy‘s journey home from the W’Indies leaving Provincetown bound for Portland.

Given the impressive amount of water spraying all over the place as we left P-town, all of it spewing forth right from the mechanical face of the seal itself, I reckoned there was a good chance the whole unit would need replacing once I delivered the boat to the tender mercies of Maine Yacht Center.…

Read More
June 22nd

Peter and Carly

I think everybody who sails has vividly imagined some variation of this nightmare: you leave a crew member alone on deck for a while to catch some sleep below, and when you come back on deck you find your crew is missing. Disappeared, with no clue what happened to them. So it was in reality for poor Pete Hill, who departed Durban, South Africa, bound for Madagascar on Thursday with his wife Carly aboard their 33-foot junk-rigged wood-epoxy catamaran Oryx. Hill reportedly went below for a nap at some point on Friday afternoon, while the boat was still just 6 miles off the South African coast, and when he awoke Carly was gone.…

Read More
June 17th

Rainmaker 1

All these pix come courtesy of Gunboat’s CEO, Peter Johnstone, who posted them today to his Facebook page. Johnstone, much to his credit, has not been shy about sharing information on the boat and what happened to it. And no, this is not the first time Rainmaker has been sighted since she was dismasted and abandoned five months ago. But it is the first time, as far as I know, that photos of her adrift have been released to the public.

According to Johnstone’s post, the hull was sighted yesterday at 35°36.28′ North, 062°17.18′ West by Capt. Reinhard Peer aboard the container ship Chicago Express.…

Read More
June 17th

CRUISING SAILBOAT RIGS: Sloops, Cutters, and Solent Rigs

Posted by // June 17, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Big sloop

In our previous episode in this series we discussed what I like to call split rigs–ketches, yawls, and schooners–where a sailplan is divided among two or more masts. Cruising sailors once upon a time preferred such rigs, at least on larger cruising boats, because each separate sail requiring handling was smaller and thus more manageable. These days, however, by far the most popular rig for both racing and cruising sailboats is the simple sloop rig. This has a single mast supporting a single Marconi mainsail with a single headsail supported by a single headstay flying forward of it.

Its advantages are manifest: there are only two sails for the crew to handle, each of which can be hoisted with a single halyard and trimmed with a single sheet.…

Read More
June 14th

MIMI ON THE BLOCK: 15-foot 1977 Drascombe Dabber For Sale

Posted by // June 14, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Mimi 1

I should have mentioned this earlier. I’m looking to find a good home for Mimi, my 15-foot Drascombe Dabber, as the sad truth is she hasn’t been used much in the past few years. This is a seaworthy open boat with positive flotation (Webb Chiles, you may recall, took a larger 18-foot sister vessel much of the way around the world) that has two rowing stations, a 5hp two-stroke outboard motor in a well, and a versatile gunter yawl rig. A great boat for Swallows-and-Amazons adventures, daysailing, camp-cruising, etc.

She comes complete with a trailer, two sets of oars, life-jackets, fog horn, fire extinguisher, and an anchor.…

Read More
June 11th

PROVINCETOWN MA TO PORTLAND ME: Doublehanded With Underpants

Posted by // June 11, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Bear front

Lunacy at last, as of early Tuesday morning, is all the way home. I brought along crew for this last mini-leg of the voyage not because it felt necessary, but rather because an old friend, a fellow sailor, Frank “Bear” Gibney, has suddenly reappeared in my life and it seemed the perfect way to reconnect. As you can see in that photo up there, Bear quickly got the hang of Lunacy‘s helm and became adroit at steering with his (well-underpanted) groin.

We blasted over to P-town from Boston on the early morning ferry and dropped the mooring there at noon on Monday.…

Read More
June 7th

NEEL 65: A Whole Lotta Trimaran Going On

Posted by // June 7, 2015 // COMMENT (1 Comment)

Neel 65 forward

We all knew this day was coming. With the recent launch and test-sailing of the new Neel 65 the concept of “cruising trimaran” has officially metastasized into the upper stratosphere. I was impressed with its smaller sibling, the Neel 45, when I got a chance to sail one in France a few years ago, and I’m wondering if this new beast has achieved what must be considered the Holy Grail in multihull design: over-the-top accommodation space combined with decent sailing performance.

Looks like they got the over-the-top accommodation space box checked off in Sharpie ink.

Lower plan

The “ground floor” plan shows no fewer than four separate staterooms in the main hull and amas, all with en suite heads.…

Read More