Sailfeed
April 23rd

By Kimball Livingston Posted April 23, 2014

Suddenly we have anecdotal evidence in plenty that there’s nothing like a hot lime-colored wing on a sailboat to set people a’wondering, and we were able to address the collective WTF in our piece about Richard Jenkins’ prototype of a wing for a wind-assisted ferry of the maybe-future.

If you haven’t seen that story, and you want to, and if looking around the Home page is below your pay grade, you can find the story here.

Among reactions to the piece, there was a posting on the forum of BAMA, the Bay Area Multihull Association, by Oracle Racing wing designer Tom Speer.…

Read More
April 21st

By Kimball Livingston Posted April 21, 2014

Eventually, someone is going to get “wind assisted” transport right.

Don’t bet against Richard Jenkins.

The same Richard Jenkins who spent his first ten adult years figuring out how to set a wing-powered landsailing speed record of 126.2 mph.

The same Richard Jenkins who recently, remotely, sailed a 19-foot, wing-and-solar-powered prototype drone from San Francisco Bay to Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, then to the South Pacific, and back, and who is now neck deep in developing his next generation Saildrone, capable of carrying a complete array of oceanographic research instrumentation to any coordinates on the blue reaches of the Blue Planet.…

Read More
April 16th

By Kimball Livingston

Once upon a time I was invited to sail from Portland to San Francisco on a rather special ship.

And that raised the question, what do you do with 22,000 square feet of sail? The Captain of the US Coast Guard Cutter Eagle said, “It’s basic sailing, just a lot of it.”

We were at sea for three days, downriver on the Columbia to salt water at Astoria, then south along the Pacific Coast from Oregon to California and the Golden Gate. Being a small-boat sailor, I had my epiphanies.

Imagine a medium breeze near or forward of the beam.…

Read More
April 8th

Remember when? Team Korea (RIP) photo by Gilles Martin-Raget/America’s Cup

By Kimball Livingston Posted April 8, 2014

In the quiet before the storm—counting down to the release of a Protocol for America’s Cup 35—I note that the chatter-flurry about a nationality requirement has died away in the expectation that “something” will be done, even at the risk of consigning a raft of Kiwi pros to the unemployment line. The “we’re a highly international team” bit has not played as well as hoped, and yes, the American team was thin on yanks. In one facet of the big picture, however, a nationality requirement is kinda too bad.…

Read More
March 5th

Posted March 5, 2014 by Kimball Livingston

Polluted? Surely not Marina del Rey.

But, out of tests performed in ten harbors in America, on the day of the Rozalia Project’s testing in Marina del Rey, that spiffy enclave four miles north of LAX, and just south of hot, hot, hot Venice Beach, rang the bell as the most polluted harbor in America.

We’ll have to add qualifiers, so don’t stop reading here. But if you care about Marina del Rey, you need to know.

Source: visitmarinadelrey.com

Source: visitmarinadelrey.com

Because, yes, we’re talking about the Marina del Rey that was created in the days when any car worth having sported tailfins to the stars.…

Read More
July 14th

Sailing Small

Posted by // July 14, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising, , ,

People often assume that we are fantastic sailors.  After all, we have made it from the Chesapeake to New Zealand – we must be awesome, right?  Well, I won’t claim that we haven’t picked up a skill or two along the way.  But cruising is a different kind of sailing.  In some ways, your boat turns into your car: a vehicle you use to eat up the miles in order to to reach faraway places.  You can slip into the habit of being destination-focused.  And that is a shame, because if sailing is good for anything, it is good for showing you the world very, very slowly. …

Read More
December 10th
http://sailfeed.com/sites/default/files/Boat%20-%20Credit%20Rob%20Gage.jpg

Courtesy of the Sail Magazine Great Escape Contest winner, here is Elliot Crowder’s winning entry top 5 reasons to win a charter in St. Vincent and the Grenadines from TMM Charters:

1. Our family of 3 live and sail on the cold & rugged Oregon Coast. Our love of sailing has us out year round.  When the wind is blowing sideways & the rain gauge shows 20 inches for the month an escape to a tropical paradise torn from the pages of Sail Magazine sounds like a dream come true!

2. Our 8-year old son is on the junior sailing team & is quite good at racing!  He has been on boats since he was days old and loves charts and navigation.…

Read More