Sailfeed
November 11th

Signal K, a true game changer?

Posted by // November 11, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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Written by Bill Bishop on Nov 11, 2014 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

Thumbnail image for ON signal K sketch basic 2.0.jpg

I see a lot of marine electronics and I’m hard to impress. There’s a lot of the new, faster, bigger and brighter appearing every year. However I get very enthused when I see real innovation appear. CHIRP sounder technology and WiFi enabled chart plotters are a couple of excellent examples. But now there is Signal K, and I’m really excited. This is potentially a game changer on a grand scale, and I’ll attempt to explain what’s happening and its long term implications for your boat.

Signal K is a universal data model that allows data and information about your boat, and other boats both locally and across the globe, to be easily shared.…

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November 11th

LIVE Podcast: Billy Cullen’s Gadgets

Posted by // November 11, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Bill Cullen, accomplished offshore sailor and crewmember aboard Serenity in this year’s Caribbean 1500, guest-hosts the podcast to discuss his favorite gadgets for offshore sailing and down-island cruising. These are far from your ‘mission critical’ items that Andy is constantly harping on, but they’re fun, clever ideas for making the best of your time at sea. Bill has sailed in most parts of the world, and has a website called thebookofsail.com, where you can find examples to most of the gadgets he talks about today. This episode was recorded LIVE at the Caribbean 1500 seminar program in Portsmouth, VA.…

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November 10th

Nice Guy Finishes First

Posted by // November 10, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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Loïck Peyron was not scared to use the word “scared” in describing himself in his record Route du Rhum crossing.

Anyone who has met this radiant, unassuming, generous man (ask the wheelchair folks at BAADS) will doubly appreciate what a force of nature he is. Or perhaps we take it for granted that one human will undertake an Atlantic crossing of 3,500 miles in a 103-foot hotrod trimaran at speeds that most sailors never see in a lifetime?

A through-the-water average of 22.93 knots?

And a new record of 7 days, 15 hours, 8 minutes, 32 seconds for the route from Saint-Malo to Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadaloupe.…

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November 10th

Slow Progress for the Caribbean 1500 Fleet

Posted by // November 10, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Thanks to a late start and slow progress at sea, the Yellowshirt team here in Nanny Cay has had time to explore Tortola more than usual. Prior to our hike up the gut yesterday, Mia and I had an opportunity to take a taxi into Road Town for a walk around and a visit to the smoothie guy. Afterwards we trekked to the big and very well-stocked Riteway supermarket just opposite the Moorings charter base for some breakfast and lunch fixins to hold us over for the week.

Meanwhile at sea, the fleet is still trudging along. Aboard Crazy Horse, the crew has been writing about their frustrating progress.…

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November 10th

Slow Progress for the Caribbean 1500 Fleet

Posted by // November 10, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Thanks to a late start and slow progress at sea, the Yellowshirt team here in Nanny Cay has had time to explore Tortola more than usual. Prior to our hike up the gut yesterday, Mia and I had an opportunity to take a taxi into Road Town for a walk around and a visit to the smoothie guy. Afterwards we trekked to the big and very well-stocked Riteway supermarket just opposite the Moorings charter base for some breakfast and lunch fixins to hold us over for the week.

Meanwhile at sea, the fleet is still trudging along. Aboard Crazy Horse, the crew has been writing about their frustrating progress.…

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November 10th

Hiking the ‘Ghut’ in Tortola

Posted by // November 10, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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Do cool stuff and then write about it.


I’m in the room now at Nanny Cay Hotel. Two double beds. Vaulted, wooden ceilings at least 15 feet high at the peak. A deck overlooking the courtyard where roosters run around and chase the chickens and the worms. A glass table (where I’m currently writing, pencil on paper in a sketchbook). A tiny kitchen with a stove, microwave and sink. A large ceiling fan hanging a good six feet down from the western slope of the roof. Tile floors and a wicker love seat. A wicker dresser as well, small bathroom and shower that is either scalding hot or a little too cold.…

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November 10th

Hiking the ‘Gut’ in Tortola

Posted by // November 10, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

,

Do cool stuff and then write about it.


I’m in the room now at Nanny Cay Hotel. Two double beds. Vaulted, wooden ceilings at least 15 feet high at the peak. A deck overlooking the courtyard where roosters run around and chase the chickens and the worms. A glass table (where I’m currently writing, pencil on paper in a sketchbook). A tiny kitchen with a stove, microwave and sink. A large ceiling fan hanging a good six feet down from the western slope of the roof. Tile floors and a wicker love seat. A wicker dresser as well, small bathroom and shower that is either scalding hot or a little too cold.…

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November 10th

sail evalCruisers flock towards the tropics, where all that sun exposure can be tough on sails. Short of alien ships on a bad landing approach, UV damage is the biggest culprit in ending the useful life of a sail. Jamie often checks sails on the boats we’re with, like Papa Djo next to us in the shipyard: in the last few months, a spate of them had no idea their sails suffered from moderate to severe damage.

It’s not difficult for cruisers to inspect their own sails and have a good pulse on the condition, so compromised integrity doesn’t unexpectedly turn a nice day on the water into a mess.…

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November 8th

After a brief respite back in Amish Country, where the Rally Control team was based after the Portsmouth pre-departure program, we’re back on the road and back in the islands. Unfortunately, it wasn’t exactly the warm Caribbean welcome we’d grown accustomed to over the past couple years.

Friday morning came awful early for Lyall, Mia and me. The alarm rang at 3:07am – it felt like I’d been woken for the dawn watch, so at least I could sympathize a bit with the sailors. But no, it was our wake-up call so we’d have time enough to make it to the airport for our 7:35 flight.…

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November 8th

After a brief respite back in Amish Country, where the Rally Control team was based after the Portsmouth pre-departure program, we’re back on the road and back in the islands. Unfortunately, it wasn’t exactly the warm Caribbean welcome we’d grown accustomed to over the past couple years.

Friday morning came awful early for Lyall, Mia and me. The alarm rang at 3:07am – it felt like I’d been woken for the dawn watch, so at least I could sympathize a bit with the sailors. But no, it was our wake-up call so we’d have time enough to make it to the airport for our 7:35 flight.…

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