Sailfeed
June 29th

By Kimball Livingston Posted June 29, 2014 – Photo of Alvimedica under sail © Daniel Forster/Team Alvimedica

Fair warning to my journo colleagues. If the America’s Cup goes to Bermuda, I have dibs on covering it for The Onion.
And if you don’t get that, take a slow walk around the block, or doublecheck your Bermuda sailing history.

Stop.

Pivot.

Our news of the moment comes from the former home of America’s Cup, Newport, Rhode Island, where the USA youth team’s Volvo Ocean Race entry was christened over the weekend by former US Surgeon General Dr. Regina Benjamin as Alvimedica, the name of the company bold enough to sponsor first time circumnavigators in one of the toughest-going round-the-world races.…

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June 28th

Testing day: mechanical and technical

Posted by // June 28, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising, Maintenance,

979 targets in Singapore

Today’s a day of tests, in two very different ways- Totem’s Yanmar engine, and Totem’s blog!

Mechanical: the engine

With a clean bill of health for our overheating woes, we are heading out today for a trial run. We want to make sure it behaves as desired before we departing on the ~3 day passage across to Borneo. Today’s distance of about 50 nautical miles, across the bottom of Singapore, should give us an excellent indication of whether the overheating problems are truly resolved.

Cross your fingers for us, because we sure don’t want to be dealing with overheating problems in the nutty Singapore port traffic.…

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June 28th

Bermuda Race Wrapup

Posted by // June 28, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing, ,

Daniel Forster/PPL

By John Rousmaniere

Hamilton, Bermuda, June 28, 2014: Actaea, skippered by Michael and Connie Cone from Philadelphia, PA and Shockwave, a 72-foot Mini-Maxi sloop owned by George Sakellaris from Framingham, MA, are the big winners in this year’s 49th Newport Bermuda Race.

The 635-mile race across the Gulf Stream had 164 starters on June 20 at Newport, RI, in five divisions, each for a type of boat. The race has no single winner (only division winners), although the winning St. David’s Lighthouse Division boat is generally regarded as the race’s top boat. The fleet was started in 15 classes, each with its own prizes.…

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June 28th

Hardesty Leads E22 Worlds, Cunningham Rebounds

Posted by // June 28, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

June 27, 2014, for immediate release

After a Day to Forget, Cunningham Has Two Races to Remember

NEWPORT, R.I. — The best sailors remember every detail of every race. But there are some days on the water that simply have to be forgotten. Day 3 of the 2014 Etchells World Championships, hosted by the New York Yacht Club in association with Sail Newport, was such a day for Jim Cunningham.

After waiting much of the day for a sailable breeze, Cunningham and his team of Jeff Madrigali, Mark Ivey and Bryn Bachman had a strong start and approached the first mark among the top 10 boats in the 95-boat fleet.…

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June 28th

Big Turnout for Long Beach Race Week

Posted by // June 28, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

June 27, 2014

From Rich Roberts for Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week

Friday’s weather: Wind 10-5k south; sunny, high temp. 75F.
Saturday’s forecast: Wind 10k SSW; sunny, high temp. 71F.

Light wind but heavy competition open Ullman LBRW

LONG BEACH, Calif.

This ain’t a commercial, but one of the four boats that won both of its races on opening day of Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week Friday was skippered by … Dave Ullman.

The sailmaker and multi-class world champion ran away from the other 15 boats in the fast-evolving J/70 class, but his rivals have two more days in the West Coast’s largest keelboat regatta presented by the Long Beach and Alamitos Bay Yacht Clubs to follow his lead about racing in light to vanishing breeze.…

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June 28th

Andreas Hanakamp, Volvo Skipper, on the 59ºN Podcast

Posted by // June 28, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

People, Racing,

Andreas Hanakamp! For the sailors out there, Andreas is a former Olympic sailor and the skipper of Team Russia in the 09/08 Volvo Ocean Race. And he’s awesome! Andy first met him in the 2011 ARC rally, and got a chance to sit down with him this year over a coffee in St. Lucia. Beyond sailing, Andreas is just overall a super inspiring dude – he climbs mountains, runs marathons, skis in the backcountry and just generally takes full advantage of life. It was a privilege for Andy to have had the chance to hang out with him for a couple days in St.…

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June 26th

Boatsitting

Posted by // June 26, 2014 // COMMENT (2 Comments)

Cruising

After sitting in an airplane for twenty-seven hours with two increasingly rangy kids, there was only one thing I wanted when I got back to Noumea.  It wasn’t a hot shower (although I needed it.)  It wasn’t a good night’s sleep on a horizontal surface (although I needed that even more.)  All I wanted as we pulled up to the marina was to see Papillon afloat.  Steal my luggage and cancel my credit cards, but please don’t let my boat be resting in the mud.

Not that I left my home unattended: I asked a friend to keep an eye on Papillon.  …

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June 26th

RETRIEVING LOST HALYARDS: A Cheap Trick That Works

Posted by // June 26, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Lost halyard drawing

I wrote about this once in a print magazine, and some people were skeptical. But I’m telling you–it really does work. I’ve done it twice at sea successfully; no fuss, no muss. If you lose a halyard up your mast, this is how to get it back from deck level without having to climb the mast.

There is one prerequisite. You need a spare halyard with a shackle on it that is in reasonably close proximity to the one you were stupid enough to let fly up the mast. Given this, retrieving the lost halyard should be easy.

Step 1: Take a loose length of line that is long enough to reach the lost halyard from the deck and tie a noose in it with a slip knot, so that you can pull the noose shut.…

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June 26th

Lost halyard drawing

I wrote about this once in a print magazine, and some people were skeptical. But I’m telling you–it really does work. I’ve done it twice at sea successfully; no fuss, no muss. If you lose a halyard up your mast, this is how to get it back from deck level without having to climb the mast.

There is one prerequisite. You need a spare halyard with a shackle on it that is in reasonably close proximity to the one you were stupid enough to let fly up the mast. Given this, retrieving the lost halyard should be easy.

Step 1: Take a loose length of line that is long enough to reach the lost halyard from the deck and tie a noose in it with a slip knot, so that you can pull the noose shut.…

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June 26th

Grael-Olson

ALICANTE, Spain June 26, 2014

Torben Grael, Brazil’s joint most decorated Olympic medalist with five medals and former winner of the Volvo Ocean Race, has been awarded the inaugural Magnus Olsson Prize for his contribution to sailing.

Grael received his award in Stockholm today along with two recipients of a scholarship through the Magnus Olsson Memorial Foundation aimed at helping young Swedish sailors make a successful career in the sport.

The two recipients are Simon Lundmark, an 18-year-old dinghy sailor in the Laser class, and Albin Johnsson, 17, who sails the Europe Class. Both are competing on a national, European and international youth championship level.…

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