Sailfeed
July 3rd

GREEN 37: New Centerboard Yawl Design by Jay Paris

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (1 Comment)

Profile and sailplane

Just heard recently from Jay Paris, N.A., who has been SAIL magazine’s technical advisor since before time began. He sent drawings and details of an intriguing upscaled version of the 32-foot centerboard yawl he designed and built for himself. (For details on that boat be sure to check this post here.) He calls this new design the Green 37, as he claims it “reduc[es] the environmental impact of construction and operation in terms of accommodation, payload and performance.” I’m scratching my head over that a bit, but in all other respects I find this a fascinating concept and would love to see one of these built someday.…

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July 3rd

Ellen in the house

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

ellen
I first met Ellen MacArthur in 1999. She was relatively unknown then, at least to the sailing community. She was a young British girl that had done a bit of sailing. I had heard of her because she had sailed the Mini-Transat and I was a big fan of the event. I got a call from my friend, the yacht designer Merf Owen. He told me his girlfriend wanted to charter my boat for the Route du Rhum race but had very little money. He said her name was Ellen MacArthur and she was hoping to do the Vendée Globe in 2000.
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July 2nd

Ice forecast and prospects

Posted by // July 2, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Ice, ice everywhere

 

And nowhere to go

The Canadians Ice Service have published the 30 days ice outlook for the Western and Central Arctic.

  • Summary for June 18 to 30:
    Average air temperatures were above normal values over most locations.
    Ice melt was near normal over most locations except 2 weeks earlier than normal over the southeastern Beaufort Sea, in the Amundsen Gulf, and along parts of the Alaskan Coast (all within the Northwest Passage).

    Aventura icebound

  • Weather forecast for July 1 to 31:
    Average air temperatures will be near normal values over most locations.

    Ice ahead

Compared to last year, the ice forecast looks much better and there is no doubt that attempting to transit the Northwest Passage from the Pacific end is a distinct advantage.…

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July 2nd

The imperfect passage

Posted by // July 2, 2015 // COMMENT (6 Comments)

DSC_1580

Sailing west from the middle (literally) of the Indian Ocean, to the Seychelles islands just off Africa: circumnavigate, and this may the best passage you make. “Near perfect sailing conditions have been encountered by boats making this passage in May and June” crows Jimmy Cornell’s World Cruising Routes. Spectacular! We’re IN! Slow passages in light air and way too much motoring in Southeast Asia would fall farther over the taff rail.

At just over 1,000 nautical miles, Chagos to Seychelles would be our longest passage in several years, and third longest ever. Preparing for passagemaking is never something we never take lightly, but despite the fact Chagos is uninhabited, we’ve rarely felt MORE ready.…

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July 2nd

A Gale or a Lobster?

Posted by // July 2, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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A Gale or a Lobster?

We were heading for Newfoundland and wound up in Nantucket. The first time I sailed alone across the Atlantic in 2008 I was heading for Iceland and wound up in England.  In my defense I had a late start in 2008 and then got nailed by tropical storm Christabel in nearly the exact same location we are in right now. Christabel blew hard enough that some other guy sailing alone had to get rescued off his boat. My dad heard about it somehow and thought it was me who was rescued.  After the storm I realized I could make it to Iceland but I wouldn’t make it back down again before the season changed and the fall weather began, so I changed course for England.…

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July 1st

HOOLIGAN NAVY: Sailing Yachts On Sub Patrol During WWII

Posted by // July 1, 2015 // COMMENT (6 Comments)

Corsair bow image

When I was boy during summers spent on the Maine coast at the mouth of Kennebec River my mother used to tell us a story from when she was a girl growing up on the river, of how once during the war a Nazi submarine was spotted near the river’s entrance. To me this always sounded crazy, until I got older and read more about the war and learned how badly German U-boats had ravaged shipping all along the East Coast right after the U.S. entered the war in December 1941. My mom’s story might well have been apocryphal, but it was not at all improbable, for in those days U-boats did indeed operate with impunity quite close to our shores.…

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July 1st

SRT acquires Class B AIS patent, consequences uncertain

Posted by // July 1, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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Written by Ben Ellison on Jul 1, 2015 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

SRT_Acquisition_of_Patent_release_clips_aPanbo.jpgFor me, this story began with a March 5th email titled “AIS patent wars – a tax on safety?” It referenced the SRT stock market announcement partially shown above and went on to say:

The whole point of using CSTDMA instead of SoTDMA in the original design of Class B was to avoid any problems with patents to ensure the successful uptake of the system by manufacturers. I see this as a tax on safety and a desperate attempt by SRT to force manufacturers to use their solutions rather than those from competitors and so create a pseudo-monopoly in the Class B world, which cannot be good for competition or the end user.

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June 30th

Car *Almost* Falls Off Ferry

Posted by // June 30, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Things are usually pretty tranquil at our 100-year-old family business, the Balboa Island Ferry. Despite our best efforts, every once in a while this happens:
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Sigh. Full story here. …

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June 29th

Sigurdur Jonsson

Posted by // June 29, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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We’ve got a special episode of 59º North this week, coming to you all the way from Iceland. I’ve been inspired by a handful of podcasts that I listen to regularly as a fan. The Nerdist podcast, which got me into this in the first place. Bill Simmons, for my sports. And more recently, two Swedish podcasts I’ve really taken a liking to. Varvet, hosted by Kristoffer Triumf. And the Huksy Podcast, hosted by Magnus Ormestad, a Swedish-based outdoor adventure sports show.

I reached out to Magnus as a fan in May while I was back in Sweden. We had coffee together in Stockholm at the Bianchi Café, a very cool Italian-inspired coffee-slash-bike shop in the heart of the city, and just down the street from the outdoor store Magnus works at part-time.…

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June 29th

Finns Go Deep on Rule 42

Posted by // June 29, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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As reported by the Finn Class regarding a problem area of the sport of dinghy racing. Posted June 29, 2015

A three day Rule 42 clinic was run by the Finn Class just before the Silver Cup in Valencia. Around 20 sailors competed at some point including the Juniors preparing for the week ahead as well as some seniors who were in Valencia for training.

Four on-the-water sessions were carried out along with de-briefings with videos from each day with detailed explanations from the judges. The clinic ended with two umpired medal races to give the sailors some experience of direct judging and the processes involved.…

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