Sailfeed
July 17th

Another essay episode for your Friday! This one is a bit more serious than last week, and looks at some of the ‘rules’ of ocean sailing from the perspective of two events from last fall – the Caribbean 1500 rally, and the Salty Dawgs. You’ll recall that six Salty Dawg boats issued distress calls last year, two of which were later rescued by the Coast Guard. The incident made national news, and was a hot button issue among the offshore sailing community. I wrote down my own thoughts immediately afterwards, but didn’t publish them until now, after lots of time to think it over and make a fair assessment of what happened.…

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July 17th

It is a strange truth that, the longer you stay in a country, the more irritating their bureaucracy becomes. Maybe the French are just tired of me and want to speed me on my way.  Maybe I’m just burnt out on doing taxes and taking ever-more-hideous passport photos for visa applications.  Or maybe I just don’t see eye to eye with these upholders of the Napoleonic Code.

A few weeks ago, I found a notice in my mailbox that a registered letter was waiting for me at the post office. I was bound to need some iron-clad identification, so I scooped up my passport and carte de sejour, waited for the designated pick-up time, and wandered over.

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July 17th

Pac Cup Tracker Goes Live

Posted by // July 17, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

Michael Chobotov's Venture a couple thousand miles ago

Via Pacific Cup
Kaneohe Bay, HI, July 17, 2014 – It’s the moment many have been waiting for: the first of Pacific Cup’s 55-boat fleet, Venture (a Jenneau 49 in Cruising Division) is expected to cross the magical line, 200 nautical miles from Hawaii late this afternoon, and you will be able to follow the race online, in real time, on the Pacific Cup website. Until then, position data, which is transmitted via satellite by the Yellowbrick devices, is being delayed by six hours to prevent, to some degree, a racing boat’s ability to view what its competitors are doing at the moment.…

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July 17th

Written by Ben Ellison on Jul 17, 2014 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

Navionics_Vexilar_iPad_app_aPanbo.jpgWow. Combining the Navionics Boating apps and the Vexilar SonarPhone WiFi fishfinder seems like an obvious development now, but there are so many marine electronics integration possibilities these days that even the ripe low-hanging fruit can be surprising. Announced yesterday at ICAST (PDF here) and available for iPhone/iPad in August (and Android later), the combined Navionics SonarPhone app means that a small boater can have a fairly sophisticated plotter/fishfinder for about $200, phone or tablet not included (and note the issue of screen visibility in an open boat).…

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July 17th

Hank Schmitt

As many of you know, I served as crew on Be Good Too, the Alpha 42 catamaran that was abandoned approximately 300 miles east of Chesapeake Bay in January. I published an account of the episode here on WaveTrain (which was also syndicated on SAILfeed) and also wrote a feature story for SAIL Magazine. In May I also published, without comment, a response from Gregor Tarjan, president of Aeroyacht, builder of the Alpha catamaran. (Gregor’s statement was also published on SAILfeed.) Hank Schmitt (see photo up top), the paid skipper aboard Be Good Too, contacted me from Bermuda as soon as he read Gregor’s statement and asked if I would publish a response from him.…

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July 17th

Manta Hits the Big Four-O

Posted by // July 17, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing, , ,

By Kimball Livingston Posted July 17, 2014

There are huge differences between the formula classes and the one-design classes of landsailing.

Which doesn’t mean that there aren’t people who play both games.

It’s one thing to be a tinkerer and build a very-cool formula flyer, but hauling along a one-design yacht, when you head to the playa, means extra time sailing. And with something like the two-seat Manta—the Manta being the most popular class at the Landsailing World Championship this week at Smith Creek, Nevada—you can have your “cruise” time with a friend. Having been a passenger aboard a two-seat Manta with Bob Dill, past president of the North American Landsailing Association and one-time holder of the outright landsailing speed record, I can attest that there are plenty of thrills built into this visually-modest little ship.…

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July 17th

A Grand Day Out

Posted by // July 17, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

Back in the day I had a yen to do a Whitbread race, as it was then. I envisioned myself steering resolutely down towering Southern Ocean swells, setting new boatspeed records to the acclaim of my crewmates, and sipping champagne from stilettos in the post-race parties. Of course a lack of skill and ambition in that direction scuppered any chances I had of doing a round-the-world race, and now of course the last thing I would contemplate doing is exposing my middle-aged self to the frigid wastes of the Roaring Forties, let alone the Furious Fifities or the Shrieking Sixties. I’m good with experiencing all that vicariously through the Volvo Ocean Race’s excellent videos.…

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July 16th

5.6 Mini Yacht Championship decided, other classes begin competition at Landsailing Worlds

By Kimball Livingston Posted July 16, 2014

A sailor is a sailor, no matter what the sailor sails.

And my point is?

The strongest reaction I ever received to a magazine article came from a piece about sailing model yachts. Those people have a passion. What’s more, I discovered that many of them are the usual suspects, people I already knew from sailing what they call “people boats.” They just have this other thing too.

So it is with landsailing.

Austin, Nevada is remote. Add a few miles and you’re at Smith Creek Playa, slightly more remote but flat and open and perfect for sailing on the hard.…

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July 16th

Breeze on to Hawaii

Posted by // July 16, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

July 15, 2014 – The breeze is on and many of the fifty-five boats racing in the 2014 Pacific Cup are posting double-digit speeds and 200-nautical-mile-plus days. At this pace, Kaneohe Bay could be welcoming the first finisher as early as this Friday, July 18.

Venture, a Jeanneau 49 skippered by Michael Chobotov and leading the Holo Holo Cruising Division, has the bit in her teeth again and is starting to smell the Hawaiian plumeria with less than 600 nautical miles to go. She’ll want to keep an eye on the rear-view mirror as Invisible Hand, a Reichel/Pugh 63 skippered by Frank Slootman, is lit up and gaining fast at 16+ knots.…

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