Sailfeed
May 16th

Capsized sailboat

We have previously discussed both form stability and ballast stability as concepts, and these certainly are useful when thinking about sailboat design in the abstract. They are less useful, however, when you are trying to evaluate individual boats that you might be interested in actually buying. Certainly you can look at any given boat, ponder its shape, beam, draft, and ballast, and make an intuitive guess as to how stable it is, but what’s really wanted is a simple reductive factor–similar to the displacement/length ratio, sail-area/displacement ratio, or Brewer comfort ratio–that allows you to effectively compare one boat to another.…

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May 15th

In Case You Missed It

Posted by // May 15, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

Here is a response submitted to SailingScuttlebutt.com in response to the pickup of The Prototype blog. I would note that it was not “submitted.”

From Dan Meyers – Newport, RI:
As I get older I figure that I have seen all of the foolishness in the world, but this week the nonsense submitted to Scuttlebutt is appalling.

Mr. Clark, I disagree with your assertion (in Scuttlebutt 3838) that Andrew Simpson “died well”. That he was a wonderful guy and a champion professional racer seems incontrovertible. But athletes are not gladiators to be thrown to the lions. They want to compete, enjoy the sport, the people they sail with and against, be fairly compensated, and then at the end of the day go home, hug the wife and kids, have dinner and go on.…

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May 15th

Mailman

Posted by // May 15, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising, ,

Ouest and I have been playing Mailman lately. I’m the mailman and I make deliveries to her. Before I give her the mail I say, “Special delivery for Ouest. Oh, hello, who are you?”

Reaching out for her stack of cards she blurts out, “O-U-E-S-T. Ouest Lill Schulte. Forty-three pounds. I live on Bumfuzzle. I’m from Mexico.”

And really, that’s all you need to know about her. With that information she should be able to find her way home from anywhere else in the world. At the very least her mail will always find her.

We’ve had something like three weeks now of nights in which there is not a ripple on the water.…

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May 15th

Putting the Foul in Antifouling

Posted by // May 15, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising, Maintenance,

By my reckoning, the Dad-Kid Humour Index peaks when the kids are about ages 3-6.  Dad specializes in Kindergarten funny.  Puns, bodily functions, and even the odd dubious word are used to hilarious effect.  When I opened this photo of Erik yesterday, Indy laughed until she almost cried.  Dad with a blue head?  Comedy genius.

I, on the other hand, closed my eyed and pursed my lips.  I know that shade of blue all too well.  Even without the subject line, I could see that Erik had been sanding the hull in preparation for fresh antifouling paint.  Which means he is covered in old antifouling paint. …

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May 14th

No More Water

Posted by // May 14, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising,

Last night we heard the noise that cruisers without watermakers dread—the long-cycling water pump—signaling we’d reached the bottom of the tank. A day or two earlier than expected, but not a big deal. We returned to Puerto Escondido, filled the tanks, grabbed a mooring ball, went to shore for ice cream, and then jumped in the pool. Needless to say the kids were not disappointed in how this day went down.

May14 1 May14 2 May14 3 May14 4

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May 14th

Sunrise at sea

This was a fast passage with very little motoring. My mate Mr. Lassen and I covered the 830 some miles between Fajardo and St. Georges in less than six days and burned only about five gallons of fuel in the process. Not my fastest passage ever between the Onion Patch and the W’Indies, but I think it’s the fastest northbound trip I’ve ever made at this time of year.

The normal pattern is to have moderate to strong easterly tradewinds for the first two or three days, followed by variable junk the rest of the way to Bermuda. If you’re unlucky you may see more junk than wind and end up motoring most of way.…

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May 13th

Another month zips past. Ouest’s Spanish is improving greatly. She knows dozens of words and is using them pretty regularly. And of course her swimming continues to improve daily. She is to the point now that we let her go out swimming to the deep stuff by herself. We watch her and call her in when she goes too far. And now when she gets tired while swimming she just flips right over and back-floats her way in.

Lowe took off yesterday. Literally. Up until now his running has been that cute little toddler run—tiny steps and penguin arms. Then all of the sudden yesterday we were on a hike when he just took off running—full sprint style with long strides and swinging arms.…

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May 13th
http://sailfeed.com/sites/default/files/field/image/Morgan.jpg

It is America's only surviving wooden whaleship. And according to The Old Salt Blog, the "shutter" plank has been fastened to the newly renovated hull, and the launch is scheduled for July 21.

OSB digs up a nice video about the restoration to accompany this news.

Here's the start of that journey:

And here is the Charles W. Morgan in (some of) its glory:

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May 13th

The Prototype: On Track

Posted by // May 13, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing,

Sander van der Borch

The America’s Cup match of 2010 was a rescue. The direction of the Cup under Alinghi post-2007 was so sour as to convince Louis Vuitton to bail out, remember? Only a risk taker with tenacity, resources and experience in hostile takeovers—Larry Ellison—could have undertaken the mission. So I guess we’ve reached that part of the movie where Princess Leah looks to Luke Skywalker and says, “Some rescue!”

It was all so pretty, wasn’t it? Finally, Stan Honey would get financing to move the sport onto a viable television platform. At last, America’s Cup boats would represent the Loud Now and not the cutting edge of some previous decade.…

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May 13th

Written by Kees Verruijt on May 13, 2013 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

hds12_via_go_free.png

Today is an excellent time to look in more depth at the Lowrance HDS Gen2 Touch, a slightly awkward name for six products that form the “top end” of the Lowrance multifunction display range. The reason is the recent release of the 2.0 software version that brings GoFree functionality — as seen above — and much more to both the Lowrance Gen2 and Gen2 Touch range. Last year I upgraded my HDS Gen1 to a HDS2T and in this entry I will compare the HDS2T to other Navico options, give you the reasons why I like it and of course discuss the new features in the 2.0 software.

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