Sailfeed
September 6th

Greetings! The news release below if of particular interest to me because one of the new owners of the Annapolis Boat Show is Mary Ewenson, my publisher at SpinSheet. I also worked with Mary a bit last year on the DelMarVa rally (and participated with my dad on Sojourner). Mary is awesome, and this should be a great opportunity. Interesting news if you’re an Annapolitan too.

Annapolis, Maryland  (September. 6, 2013) —- Paul Jacobs, General Manager of the Annapolis Boat Shows, has announced that he and a team of four local business owners have a contract to purchase the Boat Shows from C.…

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September 6th

Extreme Sailing

Posted by // September 6, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing, , , ,

With the America’s Cup fizzling (though Saturday could be a new day), the Extreme Sailing Series is consistently delivering good sailing and good story lines. I particularly enjoyed this look inside the friendship–and rivalry–between Leigh McMillan and Morgan Larson:

McMillan won the most recent match-up, by the way.

One other note: You know how high speed multihull racing organizers like to say it is about the sailing and not the Crash & Burn? Well….

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September 6th

DEAD GAL: Ruth Wharram

Posted by // September 6, 2013 // COMMENT (1 Comment)

People, ,

Wharram and women

Another multihull pioneer bites the dust. Unfortunately, I just received an e-mail this morning from Hanneke Boon, Jim Wharram’s design partner, regarding the passing of another of Jim’s partners, Ruth Wharram, who crossed the Atlantic and back with Jim and Jutta Schultze-Rohnhof (see photo up top) back in 1955-58 on the catamarans Tangaroa and Rongo. She always played an integral role in the development of Wharram’s career and business and was an accomplished ocean sailor.

Wharram, in his classic memoir of his early voyages, Two Girls Two Catamarans, described Ruth as a very important influence right from page one:

Woman-wise I had to learn too.

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September 6th

When Two Become Five

Posted by // September 6, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising,

Since we arrived at anchor, the girls have lived outside.  They have swung from the halyards and splashed noisily in the water.  They eat on deck, read on deck, and generally spent every moment they can in the open air.

Why?  Not because we are finally somewhere warm(ish).  Not to escape Dad pulling up the floorboards (which only happened twice.)  No.  Their loud, obvious presence was a beacon, a signal fire: We’re Here.  Come Play With Us.

Finally, that call was answered.  A dinghy putted over containing rare treasure: three girls aged nine, seven and five.  (Plus their parents, but since when do they count?)  The girls had seen the swinging display, and insisted on immediate delivery to our boat. …

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September 6th

Boatschooling, Part 3: Things I wish I’d known

Posted by // September 6, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising, ,

another kind of school
school
We get more questions about homeschooling than almost anything else. To try and offer meatier background on our approach I’ve split out a few blog posts on the subject: first, offered thoughts on finding a boatschool path; second, what we actually DO on Totem; and here, things I wish I’d been able to internalize before we started our homeschooling journey.

Planning to homeschool was stressful. The early months of homeschooling were, too. I wish I could have let go of the anxiety I felt. Aside from the pressure leading up to our departure (did I have the right materials on board?…

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September 5th

It Clicked

Posted by // September 5, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Racing, , , ,

Mau Mauing the Defender is one of the great traditions of America’s Cup competition. The Kiwi team and the Kiwi press have left no dirt unturned as we approach the 34th match. Meanwhile . . .

RBYACFEVD3_2628-1-780x520© Oracle Team USA/Guilain Grenier

It would seem that Oracle Team USA has brought some grief upon itself, but I remain incredulous and confused and, frankly, clueless regarding the whole kingpostgate mess and no less so regarding the jury ruling that ensued, and until the next shoe drops—it’s out there, up there, somewhere—I’ve moved on.

The skippers’ press conference on Thursday, anticipating racing on Saturday, was an interesting case in interesting times.…

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September 5th

CASCO BAY CRUISE: Bustins Island

Posted by // September 5, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Cruising,

Lunacy at Bustins

I have a few distant memories of Bustins Island from when we used to visit my father’s sister Cynthia and her family there. I remember Archie Ross, a larger-than-life character who used to run the little ferry boat that trundles back and forth between Bustins and nearby South Freeport. I remember walking in my bare feet from my aunt’s cottage down a dirt trail to a little store where we bought ice cream in Dixie Cups that we ate with wooden spoons. This memory in particular still stands out in my mind as an epiphany of juvenile summer bliss.

I got to wallow in the residue of that epiphany for a while this past Labor Day weekend, as Clare, Lucy, and I sailed up to Bustins from Portland on Lunacy to call on my cousin Laura, my aunt Cynthia’s youngest daughter, who still spends a lot of time on the island, in the very same cottage we used to hang in way back when.…

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September 5th

Historical cartography, a Skipper app first?

Posted by // September 5, 2013 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Boats and Gear, ,

Written by Ben Ellison on Sep 5, 2013 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

Skipper w historical topo basemap.jpgI was testing the new marine navigation app Skipper when I realized that historical topos were among the many “base maps” it can display, along with regular NOAA raster charts. Skipper has some interesting features (to be covered soon), but I’ve been waiting a long time for this historical angle. Haven’t marine electronics and software become so powerful that they can help us with more than just the “work” of operating a boat? As in my hopeful 2005 comment that, “One day PC/plotter memory will be so abundant that historical charts will be included in navigation packages just for the fun of it!” Of course, I didn’t realize then that tablet computers with wireless broadband Internet connections would come along, and aren’t they dandy for accessing the ever growing cloud of cartography?…

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September 4th

In our home waters of Puget Sound, traditional boats predominate. The longer we’ve been gone cruising and thought about the qualities that matter to us, the more we wonder why people don’t break out of the mold more often. A family we met on Borneo on a decidedly racy boat, Relapse, inspired the monthly cruising column which Jamie and I co-author for 48° North, a Pacific Northwest regional boating magazine; it’s copied below. In addition to the family on Relapse, the family living and traveling on the “high tech carbon rocket-ship” Anasazi Girl inspire us as well.

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September 3rd

How To Make A Fiberglass Tube, The Hard Way

Posted by // September 3, 2013 // COMMENT (3 Comments)

Maintenance, ,

Precision Engineering

Fiberglass tubes. Wow, think of all the uses. You can hold things up, or store stuff, or brace something, or just put a fishing pole in it. The tube my father and I were trying to make has an ID the same diameter as a 2″ aluminum pipe and is about three feet long. I would like to tell you what I’m going to use it for, but I can’t do that yet.

Of course you can buy fiberglass tubes, which I suppose is what most people would do. But why buy it when you can make it. Should be easy, right?…

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