Sailfeed
April 23rd

Written by Ben Ellison on Apr 23, 2014 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

Smartgauge_testing_courtesy_Compass_Marine.jpgIf you like sailing with some electronics running, or just anchoring without a generator, you’re probably very interested in the State of Charge (SoC) of your battery banks. Voltmeters, however, only hint at what’s going on, and true battery monitors require careful calibration and the installation of shunts, but still tend to get out of whack over time. Well, darned if the great RC Collins of Compass Marine didn’t go to extraordinary lengths to prove that the Smartgauge — a little known product that’s been around for almost a decade — can somehow accurately measure SoC without calibration and without a shunt, and yet still get even more accurate over time.…

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April 23rd

More Baba blog Part two

Posted by // April 23, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Baba 30 on trailer.jpg

The Baba Story         Part two

 

Once again: If my memory fails I’ll make something up that sounds right and makes me look good.

When we left the story Bob Berg had quit the TV station and was working full time as a broker. I think the brokerage was called Flying Dutchman, started by my old buddy Will Eickholt.  They were selling Tayana 37′s with good regularity.

 

One day Bob came in the office and said he had an idea for a new boat. He wanted a 30′ version of the Tayana 37. It should be a heavy little boat with the emphasis on the interior layout.

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April 23rd

By Kimball Livingston Posted April 23, 2014

Suddenly we have anecdotal evidence in plenty that there’s nothing like a hot lime-colored wing on a sailboat to set people a’wondering, and we were able to address the collective WTF in our piece about Richard Jenkins’ prototype of a wing for a wind-assisted ferry of the maybe-future.

If you haven’t seen that story, and you want to, and if looking around the Home page is below your pay grade, you can find the story here.

Among reactions to the piece, there was a posting on the forum of BAMA, the Bay Area Multihull Association, by Oracle Racing wing designer Tom Speer.…

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April 23rd

Don Street Stories: It’s a miracle he ever got published!

Posted by // April 23, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

The Don Street article started at the Annapolis Sailboat Show in 2011. I met SAIL’s editor, Peter Nielsen, at a World Cruising Club party. We started discussing Don Street. I was adamant that despite his age, he was still relevant to my younger generation of ‘real’ sailors. He sometimes talked in ancient terms, referencing long-ago obsolete technology. But the substance was still at the core. Street speaks in sailing Truths – it’s just a matter of wading through the history to uncover them.

I started writing this piece the following February. Street himself was cooperative, sending me pages and pages of personal histories he’s either written or had written about him.…

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April 22nd

PACAREA Rules

Posted by // April 22, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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By Kimball Livingston Posted April 22, 2014

And not really, of course, but it’s not all that often that the Coast Guard’s Commander of the Pacific Area, Defense Force West, is promoted to the office of Commandant. That part doesn’t become official until ceremonies in Washington, D.C. a few weeks hence, but—

three-admiralsToday, the process began with a Change of Command ceremony at Coast Guard Island, Alameda, in which Vice Admiral Paul Zukunft, Commandant-to-be, handed off the Pacific Area command to Vice Admiral Charlie Ray.

(Go Razorbacks)

We’re in good hands. In the pic we see, left to right, Zukunft, Admiral Robert Papp, Commandant, and Ray.…

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April 22nd

MID-ATLANTIC CRUISE: Bareboat Chartering in the Azores

Posted by // April 22, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Sailing to Sao Jorge

While dawdling about the North Atlantic in my old Alberg 35 yawl Crazy Horse I spent nine months in the Azores in 1995 and ’96. The beautiful nine-island archipelago just sucked me right in. With its dramatic volcanic topography, verdant sub-tropical foliage, sumptuous mid-ocean cloud formations, amazingly friendly people, low food prices, and exquisite architecture it seemed to me a paradise on earth. But if you had told me back then there would one day be a successful bareboat charter operation in the islands, I would have laughed at you.

Not that the sailing is bad. Much of the time it is perfectly splendid, with interestingly variable breezes and occasionally challenging conditions to keep you honest.…

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April 22nd

Don Street Stories: A strange cup of coffee in Glandore

Posted by // April 22, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

I was very excited to see my newest article, “Don Street is not Dead” out in the May 2014 issue of SAIL Magazine, which just got delivered yesterday with the mail. Normally writers cringe when their editors get a hold of their work, but I was very pleased with the work that Peter, Charlie and Meredith did on this piece, which was over a year in the making. The left my ‘voice’ intact.

That said, we had to cut a lot! The published piece is something like 1,500-2,000 words. My first draft, on the other hand, was over 5,000! The podcast I did with Don, which gave me a lot of material for the article, ran at nearly 90 minutes.…

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April 21st

Sickness & Travel: How to Deal

Posted by // April 21, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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My ultimate low in travel-related illness came when Stylish was three years old.  The two of us were on our way back to Canada from Spain, and we both had rotavirus.  Every ounce of liquid I forced into her came right back out.  Waiting for a connecting flight in Philadelphia, Stylish went Exorcist on our last clean clothes.  As I stood in the airport bathroom in my underwear, washing my preschooler in the sink and wondering what shirt I could rinse well enough to wear home, I knew I had hit bottom.  Parenthood is a humbling reminder that even the most elegant and cool among us will smell of baby vomit from time to time.…

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April 21st

NMEA 2000 color instrument power testing, looks good

Posted by // April 21, 2014 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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Written by Ben Ellison on Apr 21, 2014 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

Raymarine_i70_power_testing_cPanbo.jpgWhen Garmin recently introduced GNX20/21 displays, it led to questions about the power needs of similar but all-color NMEA 2000 instruments. And that led me to finally make up a special N2K cable that I can use with my trusty Power Analyzer Pro to measure the 12 volt current flow to an individual N2K-powered device. So what you’re seeing above is that a Raymarine i70 working with live data at 100% brightness level is using 0.13 amps. That’s not much by most standards, but dropping down a hair to 90% brightness reduced the power draw 20%…

NMEA_2000_instrument_power_testing_cPanbo.jpg

I got into this testing, trying all the NMEA 2000 displays above at almost every brightness level they offer.…

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