Sailfeed
July 4th

Written by Ben Ellison on Jul 4, 2015 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

FOGGY_at_BBY_6-2015_cPanbo.jpgMaine is rightfully well known for boatbuilding but the craft was largely dormant when I got here in the early 70’s, and it stayed that way for quite a while. In the late 80’s many of the talented builders I worked with at WoodenBoat School were doing repairs and restorations. A commission for most anything larger than a sailing skiff was a big deal. But wow, did that change. It’s been wonderful to witness remarkably crafted custom vessels launch at yards like Lyman Morse (now also in Camden!

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July 4th

T-Minus 24 Hours Until Lunenburg Departure

Posted by // July 4, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

It’s been a hectic week! After sailing in the DelMarVa rally, our list of refit items got longer and longer. I don’t even have enough time to sufficiently tell the whole story here (Mia is loading the boat with provisions as I type), but suffice it to say we’ve been busy. Some of the major items included:

  • Installing a new fridge (thanks Nate Horton!).
  • Replacing the UV cover on the genoa (thanks Chesapeake Sailmakers!).
  • Replacing the forward head (thanks Dad!).
  • Building new lee boards for the vee berth (thanks Micah & Mia!).
  • Installing a new boom vang (thanks Colligo!).
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July 3rd

GREEN 37: New Centerboard Yawl Design by Jay Paris

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Profile and sailplane

Just heard recently from Jay Paris, N.A., who has been SAIL magazine’s technical advisor since before time began. He sent drawings and details of an intriguing upscaled version of the 32-foot centerboard yawl he designed and built for himself. (For details on that boat be sure to check this post here.) He calls this new design the Green 37, as he claims it “reduc[es] the environmental impact of construction and operation in terms of accommodation, payload and performance.” I’m scratching my head over that a bit, but in all other respects I find this a fascinating concept and would love to see one of these built someday.…

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July 3rd

GREEN 37: New Centerboard Yawl Design by Jay Paris

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Profile and sailplane

Just heard recently from Jay Paris, N.A., who has been SAIL magazine’s technical advisor since before time began. He sent drawings and details of an intriguing upscaled version of the 32-foot centerboard yawl he designed and built for himself. (For details on that boat be sure to check this post here.) He calls this new design the Green 37, as he claims it “reduc[es] the environmental impact of construction and operation in terms of accommodation, payload and performance.” I’m scratching my head over that a bit, but in all other respects I find this a fascinating concept and would love to see one of these built someday.…

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July 3rd

Ellen in the house

Posted by // July 3, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

ellen
I first met Ellen MacArthur in 1999. She was relatively unknown then, at least to the sailing community. She was a young British girl that had done a bit of sailing. I had heard of her because she had sailed the Mini-Transat and I was a big fan of the event. I got a call from my friend, the yacht designer Merf Owen. He told me his girlfriend wanted to charter my boat for the Route du Rhum race but had very little money. He said her name was Ellen MacArthur and she was hoping to do the Vendée Globe in 2000.
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July 2nd

The imperfect passage

Posted by // July 2, 2015 // COMMENT (6 Comments)

DSC_1580

Sailing west from the middle (literally) of the Indian Ocean, to the Seychelles islands just off Africa: circumnavigate, and this may the best passage you make. “Near perfect sailing conditions have been encountered by boats making this passage in May and June” crows Jimmy Cornell’s World Cruising Routes. Spectacular! We’re IN! Slow passages in light air and way too much motoring in Southeast Asia would fall farther over the taff rail.

At just over 1,000 nautical miles, Chagos to Seychelles would be our longest passage in several years, and third longest ever. Preparing for passagemaking is never something we never take lightly, but despite the fact Chagos is uninhabited, we’ve rarely felt MORE ready.…

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July 2nd

A Gale or a Lobster?

Posted by // July 2, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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A Gale or a Lobster?

We were heading for Newfoundland and wound up in Nantucket. The first time I sailed alone across the Atlantic in 2008 I was heading for Iceland and wound up in England.  In my defense I had a late start in 2008 and then got nailed by tropical storm Christabel in nearly the exact same location we are in right now. Christabel blew hard enough that some other guy sailing alone had to get rescued off his boat. My dad heard about it somehow and thought it was me who was rescued.  After the storm I realized I could make it to Iceland but I wouldn’t make it back down again before the season changed and the fall weather began, so I changed course for England.…

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July 1st

HOOLIGAN NAVY: Sailing Yachts On Sub Patrol During WWII

Posted by // July 1, 2015 // COMMENT (6 Comments)

Corsair bow image

When I was boy during summers spent on the Maine coast at the mouth of Kennebec River my mother used to tell us a story from when she was a girl growing up on the river, of how once during the war a Nazi submarine was spotted near the river’s entrance. To me this always sounded crazy, until I got older and read more about the war and learned how badly German U-boats had ravaged shipping all along the East Coast right after the U.S. entered the war in December 1941. My mom’s story might well have been apocryphal, but it was not at all improbable, for in those days U-boats did indeed operate with impunity quite close to our shores.…

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July 1st

SRT acquires Class B AIS patent, consequences uncertain

Posted by // July 1, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

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Written by Ben Ellison on Jul 1, 2015 for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub

SRT_Acquisition_of_Patent_release_clips_aPanbo.jpgFor me, this story began with a March 5th email titled “AIS patent wars – a tax on safety?” It referenced the SRT stock market announcement partially shown above and went on to say:

The whole point of using CSTDMA instead of SoTDMA in the original design of Class B was to avoid any problems with patents to ensure the successful uptake of the system by manufacturers. I see this as a tax on safety and a desperate attempt by SRT to force manufacturers to use their solutions rather than those from competitors and so create a pseudo-monopoly in the Class B world, which cannot be good for competition or the end user.

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June 30th

Car *Almost* Falls Off Ferry

Posted by // June 30, 2015 // COMMENT (0 Comments)

Things are usually pretty tranquil at our 100-year-old family business, the Balboa Island Ferry. Despite our best efforts, every once in a while this happens:
ferry1-jpg-20150629
Sigh. Full story here.

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